Talking Horses: Jockey Club’s Playtech deal feels like a new low

date_range 17-Feb-2022
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Talking Horses: Jockey Club’s Playtech deal feels like a new low

Annual UK grocery bill could rise by £180 amid cost of living squeeze

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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‘Treat your email like laundry’: five ways to work smarter

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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What levelling up? Councils forced into tax rises and drastic service cuts

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Boris Johnson’s flagship London dock scheme on brink of collapse

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Give Boris Johnson time to fix his crises, says Iain Duncan Smith

date_range 04-Feb-2022
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Millions in UK face fuel poverty despite Sunak support, say experts

date_range 04-Feb-2022
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Cost of living crisis: Bank of England calls for wage restraint as inflation soars – business live

date_range 04-Feb-2022
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Winter Olympics 2022: 10 things to look out for in Beijing

date_range 04-Feb-2022
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Australia to target Google and Yahoo under internet piracy crackdown

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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The federal government will target search engines as it expands a crackdown on internet piracy, making it harder for Australians to illegally download free movies and music.In a move hailed by the Australian film industry, the government on Thursday introduced legislation to parliament that would effectively expand the list of websites that companies could seek to have blocked.Under existing laws introduced in 2015, copyright holders can seek an order from the federal court that requires internet service providers to block access to infringing websites.More than one third of music consumers still pirate musicRead moreThe new laws propose to expand this so that complainants could also seek an injunction requiring search engines such as Google and Yahoo to remove or demote search results for piracy websites.Those websites would be considered to have “the primary purpose or primary effect” of infringing on copyright, according to the legislation. The new laws would also allow copyright holders to more easily have mirror sites for piracy websites blocked.Thursday’s announcement comes after a campaign from Australia’s film and television industry, most prominently Foxtel and Village Roadshow. The latter has previously argued that pirates were “facilitated by Google and other search engines” to circumvent Australian laws.Ramon Lobato, a senior research fellow at RMIT’s school of media and communication, said the proposed changes would “significantly expand the scope of the existing site-blocking regime”.“The government is proposing to allow blocking of additional platforms, including cloud storage sites [cyberlockers] that are used for piracy,” he told Guardian Australia. “This could be complex to implement, given that cyberlockers are multifunctional and have both licit and illicit uses. The devil will be in the detail here.In a parliamentary submission earlier in the year, Foxtel had also requested the ability to get an urgent injunction to block sites hosting illegal streams of sporting events broadcast on its channels. So-called “live blocking” is in place in the UK.The government did not allude to such a power on Thursday when announcing the new laws and the legislation did not appear to address the issue.A Foxtel spokesman said: “Foxtel welcomes the introduction of the government’s newly proposed copyright amendment bill, which will strengthen the ability of the creative industry to combat the scourge of online piracy.”The communications minister, Mitch Fifield, said on Thursday he did not want the financial support provided to the nation’s creative industries to be “undone by allowing local creators to be victims of online piracy”.“Online piracy is theft,” he said. “Downloading or streaming a pirated movie or TV show is no different to stealing a DVD from a shop.”'We're told to be grateful we even have readers': pirated ebooks threaten the future of book seriesRead moreThe rise of paid streaming services such as Spotify, Netflix and Stan – which offer a relatively cheap way for consumers to legally access music, films and TV shows – have put a dent in the public’s appetite to access piracy websites.In February, research commissioned by the Australian Screen Association – which lobbies for anti-piracy laws – found visits to piracy websites had fallen by half in a year. It followed the new laws that led to the blocking of websites such as the Pirate Bay.Separate figures released by the Department of Communication in August found the copyright infringement rates for TV series, movies and music had fallen, but increased slightly for video game piracy.Google was contacted for comment.

Tech bosses could face criminal cases over online harm, warns UK minister

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Sending threatening posts among offences in revised online safety bill

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Beats Fit Pro review: Apple’s workout-ready AirPods Pro rivals

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Meta rivalry with Apple inflamed as Facebook parent company share price plummets

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Bose QC45 review: commuter favourite noise-cancelling headphones revamped

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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How $1bn push into podcasts led to Spotify’s growing pains

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Buy and sell one for daily use

date_range 04-Feb-2022
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Winter Olympics 2022: 10 things to look out for in Beijing

date_range 04-Feb-2022
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Brands are moving from fast to ‘forever fashion’ – but are new clothes ever sustainable?

date_range 08-Feb-2022
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fashion has a new trend for spring. Well, of course it does – that’s how fashion works. Except this time round, the trend isn’t crimson or corduroy, or Peter Pan collars or platform shoes. The hot look for spring 2022 is the “forever wardrobe”. The key pieces of the season are clothes that come with the promise that they will never go out of style: think crisp white shirts and well-cut blazers; classic knitwear and timeless little black dresses. Throwaway fashion is so last season. This spring, chic comes with a lifetime guarantee.The irony is that the forever wardrobe never went away, it just went out of style. The fast fashion industry, which exploded in the last 30 years, turbocharged the trend cycle, abandoning the principles of enduring elegance in favour of a rollercoaster of plot twists (woah, jumpsuits!), comebacks (Crocs) and about-turns (black is back, again) designed to keep an audience hooked. Bored of your jeans? Why not try leather trousers! Throw out your neutrals, it’s the season for neon!

‘My son cowers when a shopkeeper says hello’ – are the toddlers of Covid all right?

date_range 08-Feb-2022
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How we met: ‘I wanted to discover the world. He said: I’ll go with you!’

date_range 08-Feb-2022
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Rukmini Iyer’s recipe for beetroot, feta and rosemary breakfast muffins

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Louis Theroux: ‘I’ve always found anxiety in the most unlikely places’

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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‘I’ve had some hairy experiences’: actor Adeel Akhtar on racism, role models and feeling hopeful

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Why it’s the right time to lift plan B restrictions in England

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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How ‘super-enzymes’ that eat plastics could curb our waste problem

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Buy and sell one for daily use

date_range 04-Feb-2022
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Australia to target Google and Yahoo under internet piracy crackdown

date_range 17-Feb-2022
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Emmanuel Macron’s remarks on Russia set alarm bells ringing

date_range 09-Feb-2022
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Eileen Gu soars to Olympic gold as China embraces dual-culture star

date_range 09-Feb-2022
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My players deserve this’: Boreham Wood turn focus to Lampard’s Everton

date_range 08-Feb-2022
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Talking Horses: Jockey Club’s Playtech deal feels like a new low

date_range 08-Feb-2022
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Australia win Women’s Ashes series after miserable England batting display

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Australia beat England by five wickets in second ODI to win Women’s Ashes – as it happened

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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Mack Hansen makes instant impact as Ireland aim for Total Farrell

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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GOAL! Liverpool 3-0 Cardiff (Elliott, 76 mins)

date_range 06-Feb-2022
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